The Swerve: How the World Became Modern Stephen Greenblatt

The Swerve: How the World Became Modern

Author: Stephen Greenblatt
$14.99 $23.99 1499
33 items In Stock
  • Successful pre-order.Thanks for contacting us!
  • Order within
Book Title
The Swerve: How the World Became Modern
Author
Stephen Greenblatt
ISBN
9780393343403
It was a beautiful poem of the most dangerous ideas: that the universe functions without the aid of gods, that religious fear is damaging to human life, that pleasure and virtue are not opposites but intertwined, and that matter is made up of very small material particles in eternal motion, randomly colliding and swerving in new directions. Its return to circulation changed the course of history. The poem's vision would shape the thought of Galileo and Freud, Darwin and Einstein, and--in the hands of Thomas Jefferson--leave its trace on the Declaration of Independence.From the gardens of the ancient philosophers to the dark chambers of monastic scriptoria during the Middle Ages to the cynical, competitive court of a corrupt and dangerous pope, Greenblatt brings Poggio's search and discovery to life in a way that deepens our understanding of the world we live in now."An intellectually invigorating, nonfiction version of a Dan Brown-like mystery-in-the-archives thriller." --Boston GlobeBinding Type: PaperbackAuthor: Stephen GreenblattPublisher: W. W. Norton & CompanyPublished: 09/04/2012ISBN: 9780393343403Pages: 368Weight: 0.98lbsSize: 8.22h x 5.55w x 0.94dAward: Cundill Prize - FinalistReview Citations: People Weekly 09/10/2012 pg. 49New York Times Book Review 09/30/2012 pg. 28

It was a beautiful poem of the most dangerous ideas: that the universe functions without the aid of gods, that religious fear is damaging to human life, that pleasure and virtue are not opposites but intertwined, and that matter is made up of very small material particles in eternal motion, randomly colliding and swerving in new directions. Its return to circulation changed the course of history. The poem's vision would shape the thought of Galileo and Freud, Darwin and Einstein, and--in the hands of Thomas Jefferson--leave its trace on the Declaration of Independence.

From the gardens of the ancient philosophers to the dark chambers of monastic scriptoria during the Middle Ages to the cynical, competitive court of a corrupt and dangerous pope, Greenblatt brings Poggio's search and discovery to life in a way that deepens our understanding of the world we live in now.

"An intellectually invigorating, nonfiction version of a Dan Brown-like mystery-in-the-archives thriller." --Boston Globe

Binding Type: Paperback
Author: Stephen Greenblatt
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Published: 09/04/2012
ISBN: 9780393343403
Pages: 368
Weight: 0.98lbs
Size: 8.22h x 5.55w x 0.94d
Award: Cundill Prize - Finalist

Review Citations: People Weekly 09/10/2012 pg. 49
New York Times Book Review 09/30/2012 pg. 28

It was a beautiful poem of the most dangerous ideas: that the universe functions without the aid of gods, that religious fear is damaging to human life, that pleasure and virtue are not opposites but intertwined, and that matter is made up of very small material particles in eternal motion, randomly colliding and swerving in new directions. Its return to circulation changed the course of history. The poem's vision would shape the thought of Galileo and Freud, Darwin and Einstein, and--in the hands of Thomas Jefferson--leave its trace on the Declaration of Independence.

From the gardens of the ancient philosophers to the dark chambers of monastic scriptoria during the Middle Ages to the cynical, competitive court of a corrupt and dangerous pope, Greenblatt brings Poggio's search and discovery to life in a way that deepens our understanding of the world we live in now.

"An intellectually invigorating, nonfiction version of a Dan Brown-like mystery-in-the-archives thriller." --Boston Globe

Binding Type: Paperback
Author: Stephen Greenblatt
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Published: 09/04/2012
ISBN: 9780393343403
Pages: 368
Weight: 0.98lbs
Size: 8.22h x 5.55w x 0.94d
Award: Cundill Prize - Finalist

Review Citations: People Weekly 09/10/2012 pg. 49
New York Times Book Review 09/30/2012 pg. 28