Washington's Crossing David Hackett Fischer

Washington's Crossing

Author: David Hackett Fischer
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Book Title
Washington's Crossing
Author
David Hackett Fischer
ISBN
9780195170344
Six months after the Declaration of Independence, the American Revolution was all but lost. A powerful British force had routed the Americans at New York, occupied three colonies, and advanced within sight of Philadelphia. Yet, as David Hackett Fischer recounts in this riveting history, George Washington--and many other Americans--refused to let the Revolution die. On Christmas night, as a howling nor'easter struck the Delaware Valley, he led his men across the river and attacked the exhausted Hessian garrison atTrenton, killing or capturing nearly a thousand men. A second battle of Trenton followed within days. The Americans held off a counterattack by Lord Cornwallis's best troops, then were almost trapped by the British force. Under cover of night, Washington's men stole behind the enemy and struck themagain, defeating a brigade at Princeton. The British were badly shaken. In twelve weeks of winter fighting, their army suffered severe damage, their hold on New Jersey was broken, and their strategy was ruined. Fischer's richly textured narrative reveals the crucial role of contingency in these events. We see how the campaign unfolded in a sequence of difficult choices by many actors, from generals to civilians, on both sides. While British and German forces remained rigid and hierarchical, Americansevolved an open and flexible system that was fundamental to their success. The startling success of Washington and his compatriots not only saved the faltering American Revolution, but helped to give it new meaning.Binding Type: HardcoverAuthor: David Hackett FischerPublisher: Oxford University Press, USAPublished: 02/01/2004ISBN: 9780195170344Pages: 564Weight: 2.55lbsSize: 9.86h x 6.13w x 1.68dAward: Ambassador Book Awards - WinnerAward: ALA Notable Books - WinnerAward: Massachusetts Book Award (MassBook) - Honor BookAward: National Book Awards - FinalistAward: Pulitzer Prize - WinnerReview Citations: Kirkus Reviews 12/01/2003 pg. 1389Publishers Weekly 01/12/2004 pg. 49Booklist 02/01/2004 pg. 946Library Journal 02/01/2004 pg. 106New York Times 02/15/2004 pg. 13New Yorker (The) 03/29/2004 pg. 97New York Review of Books 05/27/2004 pg. 29School Library Journal 05/01/2004 pg. 176Choice 10/01/2004 pg. 354New York Times 12/12/2004 pg. 13SLJ's Best Books 12/01/2004 pg. 48New York Times 12/05/2004 pg. 41Booklist Editors Choice/Adult 01/15/2005 pg. 767Booklist Editors Choice/Adult 01/01/2005 pg. 767Accelerated Reader Quiz #/Name: 103345 / Washington's CrossingReading Level: 9.4 / Interest Level: Upper Grade / Point Value: 26
Six months after the Declaration of Independence, the American Revolution was all but lost. A powerful British force had routed the Americans at New York, occupied three colonies, and advanced within sight of Philadelphia.

Yet, as David Hackett Fischer recounts in this riveting history, George Washington--and many other Americans--refused to let the Revolution die. On Christmas night, as a howling nor'easter struck the Delaware Valley, he led his men across the river and attacked the exhausted Hessian garrison at
Trenton, killing or capturing nearly a thousand men. A second battle of Trenton followed within days. The Americans held off a counterattack by Lord Cornwallis's best troops, then were almost trapped by the British force. Under cover of night, Washington's men stole behind the enemy and struck them
again, defeating a brigade at Princeton. The British were badly shaken. In twelve weeks of winter fighting, their army suffered severe damage, their hold on New Jersey was broken, and their strategy was ruined.

Fischer's richly textured narrative reveals the crucial role of contingency in these events. We see how the campaign unfolded in a sequence of difficult choices by many actors, from generals to civilians, on both sides. While British and German forces remained rigid and hierarchical, Americans
evolved an open and flexible system that was fundamental to their success. The startling success of Washington and his compatriots not only saved the faltering American Revolution, but helped to give it new meaning.


Binding Type: Hardcover
Author: David Hackett Fischer
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Published: 02/01/2004
ISBN: 9780195170344
Pages: 564
Weight: 2.55lbs
Size: 9.86h x 6.13w x 1.68d
Award: Ambassador Book Awards - Winner
Award: ALA Notable Books - Winner
Award: Massachusetts Book Award (MassBook) - Honor Book
Award: National Book Awards - Finalist
Award: Pulitzer Prize - Winner

Review Citations: Kirkus Reviews 12/01/2003 pg. 1389
Publishers Weekly 01/12/2004 pg. 49
Booklist 02/01/2004 pg. 946
Library Journal 02/01/2004 pg. 106
New York Times 02/15/2004 pg. 13
New Yorker (The) 03/29/2004 pg. 97
New York Review of Books 05/27/2004 pg. 29
School Library Journal 05/01/2004 pg. 176
Choice 10/01/2004 pg. 354
New York Times 12/12/2004 pg. 13
SLJ's Best Books 12/01/2004 pg. 48
New York Times 12/05/2004 pg. 41
Booklist Editors Choice/Adult 01/15/2005 pg. 767
Booklist Editors Choice/Adult 01/01/2005 pg. 767

Accelerated Reader Quiz #/Name: 103345 / Washington's Crossing
Reading Level: 9.4 / Interest Level: Upper Grade / Point Value: 26
Six months after the Declaration of Independence, the American Revolution was all but lost. A powerful British force had routed the Americans at New York, occupied three colonies, and advanced within sight of Philadelphia.

Yet, as David Hackett Fischer recounts in this riveting history, George Washington--and many other Americans--refused to let the Revolution die. On Christmas night, as a howling nor'easter struck the Delaware Valley, he led his men across the river and attacked the exhausted Hessian garrison at
Trenton, killing or capturing nearly a thousand men. A second battle of Trenton followed within days. The Americans held off a counterattack by Lord Cornwallis's best troops, then were almost trapped by the British force. Under cover of night, Washington's men stole behind the enemy and struck them
again, defeating a brigade at Princeton. The British were badly shaken. In twelve weeks of winter fighting, their army suffered severe damage, their hold on New Jersey was broken, and their strategy was ruined.

Fischer's richly textured narrative reveals the crucial role of contingency in these events. We see how the campaign unfolded in a sequence of difficult choices by many actors, from generals to civilians, on both sides. While British and German forces remained rigid and hierarchical, Americans
evolved an open and flexible system that was fundamental to their success. The startling success of Washington and his compatriots not only saved the faltering American Revolution, but helped to give it new meaning.


Binding Type: Hardcover
Author: David Hackett Fischer
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Published: 02/01/2004
ISBN: 9780195170344
Pages: 564
Weight: 2.55lbs
Size: 9.86h x 6.13w x 1.68d
Award: Ambassador Book Awards - Winner
Award: ALA Notable Books - Winner
Award: Massachusetts Book Award (MassBook) - Honor Book
Award: National Book Awards - Finalist
Award: Pulitzer Prize - Winner

Review Citations: Kirkus Reviews 12/01/2003 pg. 1389
Publishers Weekly 01/12/2004 pg. 49
Booklist 02/01/2004 pg. 946
Library Journal 02/01/2004 pg. 106
New York Times 02/15/2004 pg. 13
New Yorker (The) 03/29/2004 pg. 97
New York Review of Books 05/27/2004 pg. 29
School Library Journal 05/01/2004 pg. 176
Choice 10/01/2004 pg. 354
New York Times 12/12/2004 pg. 13
SLJ's Best Books 12/01/2004 pg. 48
New York Times 12/05/2004 pg. 41
Booklist Editors Choice/Adult 01/15/2005 pg. 767
Booklist Editors Choice/Adult 01/01/2005 pg. 767

Accelerated Reader Quiz #/Name: 103345 / Washington's Crossing
Reading Level: 9.4 / Interest Level: Upper Grade / Point Value: 26